donderdag 14 december 2017

Billy Cotton & The Bandits & Alan Breeze - The French Can_Can polka (1949) (Decca F.9360 mtx DR. 14564 ) (78rpm)

The can-can (or cancan as in the original French; is a high-energy, physically demanding dance that became a popular music hall dance in the 1840s, continuing in popularity in French cabaret to this day. Originally danced by both sexes, it is now traditionally associated with a chorus line of female dancers. The main features of the dance are the vigorous manipulation of skirts and petticoats, along with high kicks, splits, and cartwheels.

Many composers have written music for the cancan. The most famous music is French composer Jacques Offenbach's Galop Infernal in his operetta Orphée aux Enfers (Orpheus in the Underworld) (1858). Other examples occur in Franz Lehár's operetta The Merry Widow (1905) and Cole Porter's musical play Can-Can (1954), which in turn formed the basis for the 1960 musical film Can-Can starring Frank Sinatra and Shirley MacLaine. Some other songs that have become associated with the can-can include Aram Khachaturian's "Sabre Dance" from his ballet Gayane (1938) and the music hall standard "Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay."

Billy Cotton & The Bandits & Alan Breeze - The French Can_Can polka

maandag 11 december 2017

Nat King Cole & Pete Rugalo Orchestra - Frosty the snowman (1950) (Capitol I203 mtx BMI2_17 6544_Y) (78rpm)

"Frosty the Snowman" (or "Frosty the Snow Man") is a popular Christmas song written by Walter "Jack" Rollins and Steve Nelson, and first recorded by Gene Autry and the Cass County Boys in 1950.
The song recounts the fictional tale of Frosty, a snowman who is brought to life by a magical silk hat that a group of children find and place on his head. Although Frosty enjoys roaming throughout town with the children who constructed him, he runs afoul of a traffic cop and leaves town, promising he will be back again someday.

Nat King Cole's version peaked at position 9 in the US pop single chart in 1950.

Nat King Cole  & Pete Rugalo Orchestra - Frosty the snowman

Dinah Shore & Buddy Clark & Ted Dale Orchestra - Baby, it's cold outside (1949) (Columbia D.B. 2582 mtx HCO 3652) (78rpm)

Baby, It's Cold Outside" is a song written by Frank Loesser in 1944.
It is a call and response duet in which a host (usually performed by a male voice) attempts to convince a guest (usually performed by a female voice) that they should stay together for a romantic evening because the weather is cold and the trip home would be difficult.

Originally recorded for the film Neptune's Daughter, it has been recorded by many artists since its original release, including Ray Charles, Dolly Parton and Michael Bublé.

The recording by Dinah Shore and Buddy Clark was recorded on March 17 and released by Columbia Records. It first reached the Billboard Best Seller chart on June 4, 1949, and lasted 15 weeks on the chart, peaking at No. 6.

Dinah Shore & Buddy Clark & Ted Dale Orchestra - Baby, it's cold outside


zondag 10 december 2017

Louis Armstrong & The All Stars - Christmas night in Harlem (1955) (Decca M 33 929 mtx L 8663) (78rpm)

Louis Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo, Satch and Pops, was an American trumpeter, composer, singer and occasional actor who was one of the most influential figures in jazz. His career spanned five decades, from the 1920s to the 1960s, and different eras in the history of jazz.

Louis Armstrong & The All Stars - Christmas night in Harlem

Andrews Sisters & Guy Lombardo & His Royal Canadians - Winter wonderland (December 1946) (Decca 23722 mtx 73695) (78rpm)

The Andrews Sisters were an American close harmony singing group of the swing and boogie-woogie eras. The group consisted of three sisters: contralto LaVerne Sophia (July 6, 1911 – May 8, 1967), soprano Maxene Angelyn (January 3, 1916 – October 21, 1995), and mezzo-soprano Patricia Marie "Patty" (February 16, 1918 – January 30, 2013). Throughout their long career, the sisters sold well over 75 million records (the last official count released by MCA Records in the mid-1970s).

Andrews Sisters & Guy Lombardo & His Royal Canadians - Winter wonderland


vrijdag 8 december 2017

Renato Carosone - Tu Vuò Fà L'Americano (1956)

Renato Carosone ( 3 January 1920 – 20 May 2001), born Renato Carusone, was an Italian musician. He was a prominent figure of the Italian music scene in the second half of the 20th century. He was also a modern performer of the so-called canzone napoletana, Naples' song tradition.

In 1949 he was asked to put together a group for a club's opening night. After some auditions, he signed the Dutch guitarist Peter van Houten and the Neapolitan drummer Gegè Di Giacomo: the Trio Carosone was born. The trio became a quartet with the addition of the Hungarian Gypsy musician Elek Bacsik on bass, guitar and violin.
Afterwards Van Houten and Bacsik left the group to pursue solo careers. Gegè Di Giacomo remained with Carosone, who contacted other musicians to finally form a real band.
During the 1950s Carosone became more and more popular, his orchestra was in great demand both in Italy and abroad, and records sales were soaring high.

Gracie Fields & New Mayfair Dance Orchestra - Christmas bells at eventide (HMV B.8065 mtx 30_11347) (78rpm)

Dame Gracie Fields, DBE (born Grace Stansfield, 9 January 1898 – 27 September 1979), was an English actress, singer and comedian and star of both cinema and music hall. She spent the later part of her life on the isle of Capri, Italy. Fields was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for "services to entertainment" in 1938, and in 1979, seven months before her death, she was invested a Dame by Queen Elizabeth II.

Gracie Fields & New Mayfair Dance Orchestra - Christmas bells at eventide